Adding Value Through Workplace Design

Imagine employees walking into your building excited to be there because the workplace environment inspires them.

Imagine leaving a lasting impression on clients and business associates because the hallways and conference rooms made them feel like they were working with a very special company.

Well executed environmental graphics add value to a business

Especially when they have meaning.

For example, a client of ours was planning to celebrate the one-year anniversary of their new office. To commemorate the new Buffalo office, they wanted to create a custom wall sculpture that would somehow reflect the region.

Through some research on the area we learned their new building was in the vicinity of the factory where the Curtiss-Wright P40 Warhawk airplanes were built by Rosie the Riveters during WWII.

Focusing on that bit of history, we built a custom wing replica with historical photos and content incorporated into the piece.

It is well made, serves a purpose, and serves to better the company’s impact on their visitors.

So the point is, the unveiling to the employees was a huge success because it will now leave lasting impressions on those who work at, and visit the office.

People lined up to read the historical information, view the images up close, and take photos of the piece. The client told us “Wall art is a hit…looks wonderful. We had about 50-60 people for the reveal. The Buffalo history is very popular for people taking photos. Awesome job and thanks for a great design.”

Why wouldn’t you want to keep your company in the forefront of clients, employees and associates minds? POSITIVE IMPRESSIONS ARE INVALUABLE.

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Stainless steel wing ready for rivets, above. Finished piece, below.

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3 things to think of when considering an environmental design project

  1. Establish the end goal

Is it wayfinding graphics to direct people? To educate, commemorate, or inspire visitors or employees? Looking to add a wow factor to make a lasting positive impression?

Whatever it is that you are trying to accomplish with your design project, be sure that it stays focused with the end goal in mind.

  1. Have the design match the goal

Make sure what you’re seeking solves the problems at hand. After all, design is creative problem solving and if the design doesn’t solve the problem of the initial goal, it’s a fail.

  1. Be sure the project can be accomplished

Work with an innovative group, like us, that will go the extra mile to get the job done. People  that research, explore unique ideas, and design custom pieces to make an impression.

Our custom environmental art pieces meet the specific needs of our clients. Each piece is unique and designed with the end goal and audience in mind.

To set up a consultation call contact us at hello@secretvalleylabs.com

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Creating a Consistent Brand

 

Would you ever try to assemble a puzzle with pieces from other puzzles? PROBABLY NOT.

Well, the same principle applies to your company’s identity, marketing pieces and brand. Oftentimes, a potential client seeks our services for a new business where we have the chance to give them a fresh identity and brand tailored to their message.

Or maybe we’re creating a campaign for a long-term client for a new product or initiative launch.

Either way, it’s our job to put the visual pieces together to get their message across.

But when too many cooks jump into the kitchen, things get messy.

Why things fall apart in building a brand identity

Ideas start coming in from uninformed outside sources –  oftentimes with good intentions. For example, in the early stages of design our team is zeroing in on the message, conceptualizing a logo and identity, mapping out a website, and laying out supporting campaigns…when BAM!

We’re presented with logo ideas from another designer, contact information for a website manager, and input from the latest marketing class the client took. Whoaaa.

Not surprising, the pieces don’t fit together.

When players are operating in isolation and not communicating, the concepts become misdirected because they are not focused on a clear message.

This creates a message and identity that is scattered… not what you are looking for when creating a brand.

The audience (aka potential clients of your business) need to see a clear picture. A well designed uniform brand attracts potential clients and gives the message that your business is SET UP FOR SUCCESS.

3 Things to keep in mind when branding your business

1. Develop a clear idea of what you have to offer your audience and who your audience is

It’s hard to communicate to an unknown audience. A misdirected message or campaign can cost your business clients and money.

Be sure that you are clear on who your audience is and focus a well-planned branding strategy with them in mind.

2. Keep the design consistent

When presenting your brand to your audience, you want to have the same targeted appearance across all of your channels.

This means that your brand identity and message needs to be clear whether a potential customer is on your website, checking out your social media, or reading an email from you.

YES, THIS CAN BE DIFFICULT.

It is a lot to take on a once, but it is well worth presenting your company clearly in every way.

To make it easier, work with a professional group, like us, that is able deliver a solid visual brand and, going forward, can provide guidelines and design elements that maintain brand consistency.

3. Plan for brand expansion

As the business grows, new services are added, trends change, and more audience touch points are developed (i.e. expansion of media channels), the brand and marketing will need to flex to continue to have an impact and influence. It’s critical to stay relevant.

To set up a consultation call contact us at hello@secretvalleylabs.com

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Storytellers

Last week we attended a fundraiser for a client for whom we had recently launched a new website. It was refreshing to have the time to stand by the bar and engage in a rambling conversation that flowed from one off-beat subject to another. Suddenly, our client mentioned he was going through our online portfolio and the big revelation he had was that we are storytellers. Exactly. He got it.

As he moved from the topic of one client to another, from identity to websites, he understood our work, he got the meaning – the message is the most important nugget of information and that’s what we focus on first. From there we have a foundation to design from – and to tell a story.

Stories enlighten, bring us together, captivate. Logos condense a story into a simple, memorable mark. Photography, typography, graphics and words explain a story in print and websites. Environmental graphics tell a story and guide. All the pieces come together to create an experience that reflects a client’s business. A brand.

We may not be sitting around a campfire or standing on a stage telling a story, but the visual stories we tell are just as intriguing…and vital to any business.

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Photo: Robin Cox

We all have a choice

preventionfocus-logoWe all have the ability to choose, yet sometimes positive choices aren’t always clear. Our client, Preventionfocus, is dedicated to helping adults and children make positive choices that positively impact their lives and the community.

We just launched their new website – the third site we’ve created for them to keep their online presence current – with the goal of clearly describing their mission and services and promoting their value. The challenge was how to succinctly tell their story of focusing on prevention while being a portal to crisis services for those in need.

We’re not done just yet. Next in line are feature videos and photos showcasing their clients and programs and coordinating social media for maximum community outreach.

Learn more about SVML.

 

We all need a little inspiration

This link was originally posted on International Women’s Day and I think it’s worth including in the stream. Whether we like to admit it or not, designers don’t work in a vacuum. At least I find myself in a creative rut when I don’t get out and look around. Keeping in touch with other creative’s work inspires me and the team.

Here’s a brief compilation of the women designers whose work influences me and keeps me excited about design and it’s relevancy to society and business. Not on this particular list, but the designer who inspired me the most as I embarked on my career in Southern California, April Greiman. Hey, it’s International Women’s Day and we rock in a unique way.

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